Popular History

Hi everyone! I’ve decided to continue blogging about history, but to do so over at my main website, since a number of readers have said they’d like to see all my content in one space, and I agree. Please keep in touch. 

Sober Words From the New York Times

On the scourge of “socialist” and “internationalist” teachers, Nov. 18, 1917. The educators in question, at DeWitt Clinton High School in the Bronx, resisted directing their students to buy Liberty Bonds, which the federal government used to support the war effort.

Illustration from the Times Magazine, 1907

Illustration from the Times Magazine, 1907

1925

1925

From the Chicago Tribune, August 18, 1925, page 19

From the Chicago Tribune, August 18, 1925, page 19

From Thomas Woody, A History of Women’s Education in the United States, Volume II. Ah yes. If we let women vote, what’s next? Walking dogs? Wearing pants? Smoking? Showing some leg in public? Dating other women?!

From Thomas Woody, A History of Women’s Education in the United States, Volume II. Ah yes. If we let women vote, what’s next? Walking dogs? Wearing pants? Smoking? Showing some leg in public? Dating other women?!

From The New York Times, July 6, 1917, reporting the demise of a short-lived progressive newspaper in Chicago, The Day Book. It had been one of the only publications in the city to consistently support organized labor.

From The New York Times, July 6, 1917, reporting the demise of a short-lived progressive newspaper in Chicago, The Day Book. It had been one of the only publications in the city to consistently support organized labor.

from the Chicago Tribune, November 7, 1903, page 3

from the Chicago Tribune, November 7, 1903, page 3

from the Chicago Tribune, March 12, 1909, page 7

from the Chicago Tribune, March 12, 1909, page 7

Yolande Du Bois at her Fiske Graduation

W.E.B. Du Bois to his 14-year old daughter, Yolande, while she was studying at the Bedales School in England.

New York, October 29, 1914

Dear Little Daughter:

I have waited for you to get well settled before writing. By this time I hope some of the strangeness has worn off and that my little girl is working hard and regularly. 

Of course, everything is new and unusual. You miss the newness and smartness of America. Gradually, however, you are going to sense the beauty of the old world: its calm and eternity and you will grow to love it. 

Above all remember, dear, that you have a great opportunity. You are in one of the world’s best schools, in one of the world’s greatest modern empires. Millions of boys and girls all over this world would give almost anything they possess to be where you are. You are there by no desert or merit of yours, but only by lucky chance. 

Deserve it, then. Study, do your work. Be honest, frank and fearless and get some grasp of the real values of life. You will meet, of course, curious little annoyances. People will wonder at your dear brown and the sweet crinkley hair. But that simply is of no importance and will soon be forgotten. Remember that most folk laugh at anything unusual, whether it is beautiful, fine or not. You, however, must not laugh at yourself. You must know that brown is as pretty as white or prettier and crinkley hair as straight even though it is harder to comb. The main thing is the YOU beneath the clothes and skin—the ability to do, the will to conquer, the determination to understand and know this great, wonderful, curious world. Don’t shrink from new experiences and custom. Take the cold bath bravely. Enter into the spirit of your big bed-room. Enjoy what is and not pine for what is not. Read some good, heavy, serious books just for discipline: Take yourself in hand and master yourself. Make yourself do unpleasant things, so as to gain the upper hand of your soul.

Above all remember: your father loves you and believes in you and expects you to be a wonderful woman.

I shall write each week and expect a weekly letter from you.

Lovingly yours,

Papa