Popular History

nycartscene:

Opens Tuesday, June 26, 6-8p:

Our Ladies of Infamy and Grandeur
 Graham Preston

East Village Visitors Center, 75 East 4th St., NYC (bt 2nd Ave & Bowery)

The exhibition of five gilded paintings will honor the exploits, undertakings and legends of lost cultural heroines from Manhattan’s historical Five Points neighborhood.

Preston arrived at the concept for this series through numerous conversations with his friend and mentor, Tom Sanford. Additionally, in the artist’s words, “I came up with the initial idea for this series of paintings while reading ‘The Blackest Bird’ by NYC author Joel Rose. I wanted to explore the lore of embellished accounts from Manhattan’s early days […] The implied iconography in these paintings calls our attention to narratives which, in some cases, have managed to live on through time as mere sentiments found within a few sentences in a couple of books […] I wanted to make small paintings which glorify small events by rather insignificant and even infamous individuals within the context of our written histories.”

Presented by Fourth Arts Block. Curated by Keith Schweitzer.- thru Sept 5

(via coolchicksfromhistory)

A lady should study, not to shine, but to act.

—Catharine Beecher, 1827, “Female Education”

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Ah, Colette. One of the most influential French authors of her time, she wrote about (and acted out) sexuality in a time that was tres taboo. After the divorce of her first husband, she found notoriety as a music hall dancer, where she performed some very suggestive dances with her lover, the Marquise de Belbeuf, nearly causing a riot.
After she married her second husband, she started a very publicized and scandalous affair with her husband’s son from a previous marriage, which eventually caused the end of that marriage.
Her third and final husband was Maurice Goudeket, a Jewish man whom she financially supported and hid during the Nazi occupation in Paris. After the war, she wrote her most famous book, Gigi, in 1945, which became a hit movie in 1949.

fuckyeahhistorycrushes:

Ah, Colette. One of the most influential French authors of her time, she wrote about (and acted out) sexuality in a time that was tres taboo. After the divorce of her first husband, she found notoriety as a music hall dancer, where she performed some very suggestive dances with her lover, the Marquise de Belbeuf, nearly causing a riot.

After she married her second husband, she started a very publicized and scandalous affair with her husband’s son from a previous marriage, which eventually caused the end of that marriage.

Her third and final husband was Maurice Goudeket, a Jewish man whom she financially supported and hid during the Nazi occupation in Paris. After the war, she wrote her most famous book, Gigi, in 1945, which became a hit movie in 1949.

via questionableadvice:

~ The Referee & Cycling Trade Journal: A Weekly Record and Review of Cycling and the Cycling Trade, 1893

via questionableadvice:

~ The Referee & Cycling Trade Journal: A Weekly Record and Review of Cycling and the Cycling Trade, 1893


Classical studies keep alive the sacred tradition of the moral and intellectual life of the human race. To curtail or enfeeble such studies would, in my eyes, be an act of barbarism, a crime against all true and high civilization, and in some sort an act of high treason against humanity.

—French philosopher and education reformer Victor Cousin, 1831, arguing that the nascent French public education system should be devoted as much to knowledge as to religious teachings or the pragmatic needs of the state and economy. This made the French system distinct from the German and the American.

Via Smithsonian:

“The war [of 1812] was so ill conceived and ineptly run that the government wanted to forget the whole embarrassment almost from the moment it ended,” says Gordon Wood, a leading historian of the early United States. He believes this willful amnesia, and the illusions that fueled the War of 1812, reflect a strain in the nation’s character that has surfaced many times, right down to Afghanistan and Iraq. “History should teach humility and prudence, but America doesn’t seem to learn. I’ve never seen a virgin who loses her innocence so often.”

Via the Ohio Federal Art Project, 1938

Via the Ohio Federal Art Project, 1938

Via the Iowa Art Program, a division of the Works Progress Administration, 1936-1941

Via the Iowa Art Program, a division of the Works Progress Administration, 1936-1941